Mono: now I feel weird…

I’ve resisted installing Mono for a long time. The thought of .NET and C# has had me shivering, but finally an application made me install it. The application I wanted is Tomboy. A little application that sits in the Gnome panel and lets you take notes and create links between them. I just got it installed and I’m liking it already.

Before I switched offices, my desktop was littered with little post-it notes with arrows from one to another or logical grouping telling me which belonged together. Before my move I wrote them down as a list, 2.5 pages worth. And that was only for work. I’m hoping that Tomboy will fill that spot and let me make the notes on my computer and leave it at that. One more excuse less to use a pen. As if my handwriting would be getting any better.

But I still feel like I’ve sold my soul, or something similar. Or then I’ll begin to appreciate what it’s all about. Maybe hacking Tomboy to support the notes that my Nokia 6820 allows me to take will help in understanding Mono. Or not.

Installing Fedora Core 2 on a HP Compaq nw8000

I just got a new laptop for work. It’s a HP nw8000, a high-end mobile workstation. And that’s what it seems like, especially with a screen resolution of 1600×1200… What follows is a step-by-step guide on how to get Fedora Core 2 (Linux) up and running on it. If you’re not into that sort of thing, you might want to move on.

Happy Retirement Alvin!

I don’t think that I am alone in remembering the days in the mid-eighties when Alvin and Dr. Ballard were in the headlines around the world. By the time the Titanic was found and the first video images of it lying in the bottom of the Atlantic were broadcast, I was already a nut for wrecks in the bottom of the sea. The Wasa ship and the Titanic were the reasons why I considered Marine research as a career option. I was serious enough that I even considered it during high school. All thanks to Alvin and Dr. Ballard. I ended up a computer scientist and whatnot else. But at times I still wonder what it would have been like…

So, enjoy your retirement Alvin!

10,000 Revisited

I while back I posted on hitting the 10,000th image taken with our digital camera. Some time ago Tim Bray pointed out that his camera thoughtfully gave each picture a guaranteed unique name. So I thought the transition over the limit of 9999 would be smooth, but no. The camera decided to go over the milestone several times completely screwing up the internal counter. Now every time we download images from the camera we have to rename them so that they have a unique name. I hope Tim has better luck with his cameras. And that our next camera will anticipate the 10,000 shot boundary.