The seductive danger of addiction

Spider web in rye field during sunrise

No, this post won’t be of any kind of substance addiction. But it is a direct continuation on the previous post in which I mentioned that I’m now addicted to CrossFit (as I expected to be). As easy as it would be to say that becoming addicted to taking care and improving my fitness is only a good thing, there are dangers involved.

Naturally the most glaring danger in addiction to fitness is doing too much – and in the case of a new athlete: too soon. But even these obvious points are not up for discussion today. What I want to bring up is very much an internal battle that every athlete faces at one time or another. It has to do with when not to go and train.

Let’s illustrate with my recent experience: two and a half weeks ago I was frustrated by how poorly I did during the WOD and how tired I had been that morning. I was out of breath earlier than expected and could not recover during the brief rest periods that were programmed. Later in the evening I had some very slight fever sensations, but nothing too serious. Two days after that (on wednesday) I was at the box again, but tackling the WOD a bit easier just to see how it felt. The following monday I was at the box again and everything seemed to go fine, so I decided to go for a run with the dogs later in the afternoon. 6K in +5°C, shouldn’t have been an issue, but the underlying cause for my poor performance a week earlier resurfaced and I really caught a cold. So, after a weeks rest, I’ve finally been able to return to the box this week. And yes, I have enjoyed every minute of it!

So, every time you are not feeling quite there, go read the list of 8 signs that you are too sick for the box over on Tabata Times and be honest with yourself. Giving your body time to heal from even a slight cold will help you get back much quicker.

P.S. I did have a better picture for this post in mind, but for the life of me I can’t remember when I took and and thus can’t easily find it.